Maryland Building Codes

How to Find Maryland Building Codes

The state of Maryland passes building codes at the state level. There is also some local involvement in the adoption of building codes for the construction, engineering and design industries. Maryland building professionals should first get familiar with the process of how building codes are adopted and become law in Maryland. They can then figure out how to find these Maryland building codes for use in their business.

Step 1:

Get familiar with how laws, rules and regulations related to building and construction come about in Maryland. At the state level, the legislature has the power to adopt pretty much any constitutional law. It can also delegate authority to pass rules and regulations to a Maryland administrative agency.

In the case of Maryland building codes and construction rules and regulations, the Maryland Codes Administration plays a large part in the Maryland administrative law for this industry. The Maryland Building Performance Standards Regulations prescribe which building codes and amendments are adopted for use in Maryland. You may see links to the regulations in the Resources below.

After these regualations are passed and codes adopted, they go to the local Maryland county and city building departments. The local government may then amend certain portions of the Maryland building codes.

Step 2:

If you are working on construction or maintenance in a Maryland county or city, the first thing you need to do is find out if there are any amendments to the state building codes in that local city or county. To aid in this step, the Maryland Codes Administration has a directory of local building departments. Use the link in the Resources below to find the local office. Get a copy of any amendments from that office.

Step 3:

Next, click on the “Maryland Building Performance Standards List of Adopted Codes and Standards” page in the Resources below. That document will tell you which building codes have been adopted. You then know which codes or standards to find.

Step 4:

From there, if you know the publisher, you can contact the publisher to get a copy of a building code adopted in Maryland. If you do not know the publisher because you are unfamiliar with that particular industry or code, then ask the Maryland Codes Administration how to access that particular building code. Use the following contact information:

Maryland Codes Administration

100 Community Place

Crownsville, MD 21032-2023

410-514-7218

You should also refer to the administration’s main page for additional information related to building codes in Maryland (see Resources).

It in business

IT In Business: The Quality of IT: Quality, Security and Resilience Must Not Be Compromised

Well qualified people can always be found who will work at a lower rate, but there is no substitute for experience and proven track record.

Having established the business need and researched the IT marketplace to determine the cost, the business will have an IT strategy.

The business need/benefit equation forms the basis for the plan and from this IT policies should be established and published to cover the use of all IT equipment and services from servers and software to personal computers and mobile devices.

Establish the Deliverables

It will now be necessary to exercise quality control over the package being delivered or being planned. To many this will equate to squeezing down costs to create a lean, mean service to the organisation. It is always relatively simple to find a cheaper method once a standard has been established, but great care must be exercised to ensure that economies are not taken so far as to compromise quality, security and resilience.

Best Versus Cheapest

Lower cost software and free applications often appear to be a tempting option, but consider why market leaders have bigger price tickets. Usually, the reasons come down to levels of ongoing development and quality of support.

Similarly, well qualified people can always be found who will work at a lower rate, but there is no substitute for experience and proven track record. Experience and knowledge of IT application to a particular business is often worthy of retention and loyalty also has a value.

All change must be measured against the business need/benefit equation and safety margins must be allowed for.

Quality Stems from Control

Many budding businesses allow IT to grow in an un-ordered fashion. New key people bring their own technology solutions into the organisation and these are often adopted without due consideration for the general work flow.

New software offerings come to the marketplace with low introductory prices or free trial periods to entice experimentation, but the question will always remain – How does it fit the IT strategy and the overall business plan?

Changes to the strategy must also take into account the mid and long-term support and maintenance requirement. Will a free download or low price package be adequately supported and developed over time? Will new employees, service providers and outsource solutions provide sound methodology and clear documentation to guarantee process redundancy in the event of forced un-planned change?

IT Must Serve the Business and Not the Individual

Poorly considered change in technology results in an IT function that serves individuals rather than the business as a whole. There may be a very convincing case for software that improves the efficiency of a function for a person or department, but the output must also mesh with the business as a whole.

Know What You Want

IT management for an organisation may be full time, part time or outsourced, but there must always be a clear strategy and enough policy strength to resist deviation from the plan.